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INSTITUTE FOR CLINICAL RESEARCH EDUCATION (ICRE) COURSE DESCRIPTIONS

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ICRE COURSE SCHEDULES

Clinical Research

Medical Education

DISABILITY RESOURCES AND SERVICES

The ICRE supports and follows the diversity policies of the Office of Diversity, Health Sciences. Students needing support and/or accommodation may request it through the University's Office of Disability Resources and Services.

If you have a disability that requires special testing accommodations or other classroom modifications, you need to notify both the instructor and Disability Resources and Services no later than the second week of the term. You may be asked to provide documentation of your disability to determine the appropriateness of accommodations. To notify Disability Resources and Services, call 412-648-7890 (Voice or TTD) to schedule an appointment. The office is located in 216 William Pitt Union.


"I learned an enormous amount through excellent classes at the ICRE."

—Former ICRE Trainee


CLINICAL RESEARCH

CLRES 2005: Computer Methods in Clinical Research
1.0 credit(s); Offered every Summer
The course provides instruction on the use of computerized methods for clinical research. Dataset manipulation, descriptive statistics, and the graphical presentation of data will be presented using a standard statistical package.

Click here for course syllabus.

Prerequisites: None
CLRES 2010: Clinical Research Methods
3.0 credit(s); Offered every Summer
This course covers fundamental concepts and basic analytic methods pertaining to the design, analysis, and interpretation of clinical research studies. The course is broadly divided into three major analytic areas: (1) basic epidemiology and observational methods, (2) interventional and randomized controlled trials, and (3) clinical epidemiology and evidence-based medicine. Each section of the course will last 7–9 sessions and culminate in a short examination. The first section of the course will cover concepts of association and outcome, introduce standard epidemiologic concepts of incidence and prevalence, and define and describe relative risk, absolute risk, attributable risk, and the various methods for calculating these quantities in different observational research designs. Definitions of and methods for reducing bias and confounding are major components of this section. The second section introduces interventional trials, including the four phases of drug trials, the importance and effects of randomization, and the analysis and interpretation of controlled trials. Methods for comparing results across trials, as well as an introduction to nonstandard trial designs, are provided. The final section of the course introduces the concepts of clinical epidemiology, including evidence-based medicine, the interpretation of diagnostic tests, the construction and use of clinical prediction rules, and the evaluation of screening for chronic disease.

Click here for course syllabus.

Prerequisites: None
CLRES 2017: Clinical Research Informatics
3.0 credit(s); Offered during the Spring in even years
This course is an introduction to the emerging field of clinical research informatics (CRI). It involves informatics solutions in support of scientists who conduct clinical research, as well as those who translate evidence in biological, clinical, and epidemiological studies. CRI endeavors to improve clinical research information systems, recruitment of participants to clinical trials, mining of electronic health records for comparative effectiveness research, scientific collaboration, data sharing, re-analysis of extant data, patient registries, results databases, optimization of research workflows, semantic harmonization, and more. Enrollment by instructor permission only.
Prerequisites: None
CLRES 2020: Biostatistics
4.0 credit(s); Offered every Summer
This course focuses on basic concepts and statistical methods and their application to problems in the health and biomedical sciences. Topics include data description and summarization, basic probability theory, estimation, and hypothesis testing with emphasis on one- and two-sample comparisons involving continuous and categorical data. Linear regression and analysis of variance will be introduced. Trainees will develop their analytic skills through the analysis and discussion of large clinical studies.

Click here for course syllabus.

Prerequisites: CLRES 2005
CLRES 2021: Analysis of Variance (ANOVA) and Regression
1.0 credit(s); Offered every Fall
The course is designed for medical researchers who are not biostatistics majors. Topics covered include multiple linear regression, regression diagnostics, ANOVA, analysis of covariance, confounding, mediation, moderation, and model selection. At the completion of the course, trainees should be able to understand the appropriate uses of ANOVA and linear regression, to assess their appropriateness and adequacy, to analyze simple datasets taken from the fields of medicine and public health, and to summarize results from regression models via written communication.

Click here for course syllabus.

Prerequisites: CLRES 2005; CLRES 2020
CLRES 2022: Logistic Regression
1.0 credit(s); Offered every Fall
This introductory course in logistic regression modeling is intended for physicians in fellowship training programs and other researchers with a limited background in statistics. The course focuses on regression methods for binary data and on the basics of maximum likelihood inference. At the completion of the course, trainees should be able to understand how logistic regression can be used to address a variety of epidemiologic and clinical questions; to interpret models and assess their appropriateness and adequacy; to develop analytic skills through the analysis of datasets taken from the fields of medicine and public health; and to develop oral and written communication skills through the description of analytic strategies and the summarization and interpretation of results.

Click here for course syllabus.

Prerequisites: CLRES 2005; CLRES 2020; CLRES 2021
CLRES 2023: Survival Analysis
1.0 credit(s); Offered every Spring
This is an introductory course in regression modeling of time-to-event data. It is intended for physicians in fellowship training programs and other researchers with a limited background in statistics. The course focuses on descriptive methods for survival data, survival analysis, and issues pertaining to time-dependent covariates. At the completion of the course, trainees should be able to recognize when it is necessary to account for time in the analysis of yes/no outcomes and appropriately summarize time-to-event data; be able to interpret the survival analysis model and assess the appropriateness and adequacy of the model; be familiar with issues in the design, analysis, and interpretation of studies involving time-dependent covariates; be able to apply analytic skills to the analysis of datasets taken from the fields of medicine and public health; and be able to develop oral and written communication skills through the description of analytic strategies and the summarization and interpretation of results.

Click here for course syllabus.

Prerequisites: CLRES 2005; CLRES 2020; CLRES 2021; CLRES 2022
CLRES 2025: Design and Analysis of Biomarker Studies
1.0 credit(s); Offered during the Spring in even years
The objectives of this course are to identify, describe, and apply the statistical and epidemiologic knowledge, tools, and perspectives necessary for effectively designing, analyzing, and interpreting biomarker studies. Only a brief introduction will be provided on clinical and laboratory aspects of biomarker development; instead, the course will focus on the study design and associated analysis issues given a particular biomarker or panel of biomarkers and a corresponding set of clinical outcomes. Although practical applications and general perspectives will primarily focus on cancer research, the described methods are broadly applicable to a range of clinical and epidemiologic settings. Articles will serve as references for this class. In addition to the prerequisites listed below, trainees will also benefit from having some exposure to regression analysis (ICRE courses include CLRES 2021 and CLRES 2022).

Click here for course syllabus.

Prerequisites: CLRES 2005; CLRES 2010; CLRES 2020
CLRES 2026: Analysis of Correlated Data
1.0 credit(s); Offered every Spring
CLRES 2026 will provide information on statistical methods for analyzing data arising from multilevel or longitudinal studies. The first half of the course lectures will focus on models for continuous data, including mixed effects models, fixed effects models, and generalized estimating equations. The second half of lectures will extend to analysis in the generalized linear model setting (binary outcomes, count data, etc.) We will show students how to investigate data graphically and descriptively before beginning statistical modeling and will introduce students to topics on missing data, group trajectory modeling, and sample size estimation. We will use homework assignments and articles from multilevel and longitudinal studies to facilitate learning of concepts discussed in class.

Click here for course syllabus.

Prerequisites: CLRES 2005; CLRES 2020; CLRES 2021; CLRES 2022
CLRES 2040: Measurement in Clinical Research
1.0 credit(s); Offered every Summer
The course focuses on properties of good measurement that are integral to the research process. Specific objectives are to analyze methods for testing psychometric properties (reliability and validity) of psychological instruments and physiological instruments; to evaluate the adequacy of selected scaling methodologies used in research; to apply knowledge of instrumentation to the description of a psychosocial instrument and a physiological instrument for a research proposal; and to synthesize course content with statistical criteria for scale evaluation and make decisions regarding scale revision. The domain sampling model is presented as the major theory of measurement error, with the parallel test model presented as a special case of the domain sampling model. The construct, criterion, and content validity of psychosocial instruments are explored, and methods for evaluating each of these relative to specific instruments are presented. A variety of scaling methodologies, as well as the principles involved in the design and formatting of questionnaires, will be discussed.

Click here for course syllabus.

Prerequisites: None
CLRES 2045: Survey Design and Analysis
1.0 credit(s); Offered every Spring
Survey Design and Data Analysis will provide information on the skills and resources needed to design and conduct survey and techniques of analyzing survey data. The skills include identifying and developing specific survey objectives, designing survey studies, sampling respondents, developing reliable and valid self-administered questionnaires, and administering surveys. The techniques of analyzing survey data include both classic methods such as factor analysis and advanced methods such as item response theory. A majority of lectures will focus on survey research, constructing surveys, response set, survey administration methods, questionnaire construction and programming surveys, sampling and power calculation, maximizing response rates, data coding and entry, reliability and validity, survey data analysis, factor analysis and item response theory. The students will be introduced to the internet based survey and the computerized adaptive testing to broaden their scope of the current survey design and collection. I will use manuscripts of survey data and protocols of completed studies to facilitate learning of concepts discussed in class.

Click here for course syllabus.

Prerequisites: CLRES 2040
CLRES 2050: Ethics and Responsible Conduct of Research - LIVE
1.0 credit(s); Offered every Spring
CLRES 2050 Live aims to enhance students’ ability to think about the ethical dimensions of research, especially research involving human subjects, and to participate thoughtfully and knowledgeably in the ethical design and review of research protocols. By the end of the course, students should be able to: (1) Describe the historical context for today’s heightened scrutiny of clinical research, (2) Identify and explain the basic concepts, values, and potential ethical conflicts associated with the conduct of human subjects research, (3) Define the elements of scientific misconduct, (4) Demonstrate a commitment to integrity in the conduct of scientific research, (5) Demonstrate a commitment to advocate for the rights and welfare of human research subjects, (6) Analyze a research protocol from the ethical point of view according to criteria developed by federal regulatory agencies and local Institutional Review Boards, (7) Explain a scientific research protocol in language that promotes laypeople’s understanding sufficient to provide meaningful informed consent and (8) Demonstrate communication skills adequate to obtain a potential research subject’s meaningful informed consent.

Click here for course syllabus.

Prerequisites: None
CLRES 2050: Ethics and Responsible Conduct of Research - ONLINE
1.0 credit(s); Offered every Spring
CLRES 2050 Online aims to enhance students’ ability to think about the ethical dimensions of research, especially research involving human subjects, and to participate thoughtfully and knowledgeably in the ethical design and review of research protocols. By the end of the course, students should be able to: (1) Describe the historical context for today’s heightened scrutiny of clinical research, (2) Identify and explain the basic concepts, values, and potential ethical conflicts associated with the conduct of human subjects research, (3) Define the elements of scientific misconduct, (4) Demonstrate a commitment to integrity in the conduct of scientific research, (5) Demonstrate a commitment to advocate for the rights and welfare of human research subjects, (6) Analyze a research protocol from the ethical point of view according to criteria developed by federal regulatory agencies and local Institutional Review Boards, (7) Explain a scientific research protocol in language that promotes laypeople’s understanding sufficient to provide meaningful informed consent and (8) Demonstrate communication skills adequate to obtain a potential research subject’s meaningful informed consent.

Click here for course syllabus.

Prerequisites: None
CLRES 2071: Research Design and Development Part I
3.0 credit(s); Offered every Fall
The purpose of the integrated methods course is to build on the skills learned in the methodological core and provide a hands-on research experience. Trainees will learn the phases of the research process from conception to design and, ultimately, to implementation of the research. Through a combination of group sessions and independent work, trainees will use a research topic of their choice to develop their own research proposal in the form of an NIH grant application. The application will include sections on specific aims, background and significance, previous work, and methods. In addition, trainees will review and critique the work of their peers. Mentor must be identified prior to enrollment.

Click here for course syllabus.

Prerequisites: CLRES 2005; CLRES 2010; CLRES 2020; CLRES 2040
CLRES 2072: Research Design and Development Part II
2.0 credit(s); Offered every Spring
The purpose of the integrated methods course is to build on the skills learned in the methodological core and provide a hands-on research experience. Trainees will learn the phases of the research process from conception to design and, ultimately, to implementation of the research. Through a combination of group sessions and independent work, trainees will use a research topic of their choice to develop their own research proposal in the form of an NIH grant application. The application will include sections on specific aims, background and significance, previous work, and methods. In addition, trainees will review and critique the work of their peers. (Mentor must be identified prior to enrollment. CLRES 2050 is taken simultaneously.)

Click here for course syllabus.

Prerequisites: CLRES 2005; CLRES 2010; CLRES 2020; CLRES 2040; CLRES 2071
CLRES 2075: Seminar For Understanding Principles and Practices of Research Techniques (SUPPORT)
0.5 credit(s); Offered every Fall and Spring
The SUPPORT Seminar is a mandatory thrice-monthly series for first-, second- and research-year students in the Clinical Scientist Training Program and research year students in the Doris Duke Clinical Research Fellowship (fifth-year students present a mock thesis defense during the spring semester, but do not enroll in the course). The objectives of the seminar are: 1) to provide a supportive setting for presentation of mentored research projects in progress, 2) to provide the opportunity for students to practice their public speaking skills, 3) to allow students to receive constructive feedback on research design, analysis, and presentation, including formal peer and faculty assessment of abstracts, posters, manuscripts, and oral presentations, 4) to teach the fundamentals of constructive feedback, 5) to provide the opportunity to share their work with colleagues, and 6) to create opportunities for peer networking and peer mentoring.

Click here for course syllabus.

Prerequisites: None
CLRES 2076: Introduction to Grant Writing
1.0 credit(s); Offered every Spring
Obtaining peer-reviewed grant support is one of the most critical determinants to academic and career success, yet the process is highly challenging. Through select readings and podcasts, the writing of a draft grant application to request funds from one of the many seed programs available to Pitt students and faculty, and class discussions led by a long-time NIH-funded clinical investigator, Introduction to Grant Writing CLRES 2076 will provide CEED trainees, clinical fellows, post-doctoral students, and junior faculty without any prior grant writing experience with useful knowledge, insights, and skills in the grant writing process to improve their chances of later funding and subsequent career success. Please note that this course is NOT INTENDED for Master's Degree students.

Click here for course syllabus.

Prerequisites: None
CLRES 2080: Master's Thesis Research
1.0-3.0 credit(s); Offered every Summer, Fall, and Spring
Trainees may register for this course with approval from the mentor and selected faculty of the Degree Granting Programs in Clinical Research Curriculum Committee. The course is designed for trainees who are prepared to undertake their thesis or substantive research project.
Prerequisites: None
CLRES 2085: Directed Research/Independent Study in Clinical Research
1.0-3.0 credit(s); Offered every Summer, Fall, and Spring
For Master of Science and Doctoral Certificate in Clinical and Translational Science students. An independent study project is designed by the student to pursue an area of study within clinical research that is not covered by the established curriculum. It cannot be used to replace required or core courses. The project is designed by the student and requires that an Institute for Clinical Research Education (ICRE) faculty member supervise the project. The student will complete the directed research independent study form, and the faculty preceptor and Director of Academic Programs must approve it. An independent study project may carry 1-3 graduate semester credits, assigned at the faculty member’s discretion based on the project proposed. Doctoral CTS students may only register for a maximum of 2 credits.

Click here for course syllabus.

Prerequisites: None
CLRES 2086: Clinical Research Teaching Practicum
0.5-3.0 credit(s); Offered every Summer, Fall, and Spring
The objective of this teaching practicum is to provide students then opportunity to design and/or implement a curriculum. This practicum involves curriculum development and implementation (i.e., instruction). Each year the course directors will assess whether substantive curriculum development/refinement is necessary prior to instruction.

Click here for course syllabus.

Prerequisites: None
CLRES 2095: Introduction to Pharmacoepidemiology
2.0 credit(s); Offered during the Spring in even years
This course is an introduction to the field of pharmacoepidemiology which uses epidemiologic methods to examine the benefits or risk of medications in the population. In addition to lectures, students will be given the opportunity to examine and critique the literature in this area. Prerequisites: Introductory epidemiology, literature evaluation/statistics or clinical research methods course or with course director approval.

Click here for course syllabus.

Prerequisites: None
CLRES 2107: Comparative Effectiveness Research
2.0 credit(s); Offered every Fall
This course will define CER and highlight the history and current national efforts in promoting CER for drugs, devices and other interventions. The curriculum will deal with conceptualization, design, sampling, modeling, data collection and analysis used in CER studies. The course provides an examination of many of the important issues in CER. The curriculum was developed so the students learn research methodology, become familiar with problems and controversies and develop an appreciation of the complexity of designing CER studies. The discussion of the topics will be interactive and many sessions will be led by the students. Students are expected to review 1-2 pertinent papers at each session, lead discussion of assigned topics, participate in debates, form small groups for discussions, critique other students’ work and actively participate in the class.

Click here for course syllabus.

Prerequisites: None
CLRES 2108: Patient Registries and Electronic Health Records in CER
1.0 credit(s); Offered during the Fall in odd years
This course explores the role of research registries that include electronic health record data in comparative effectiveness research. Students will gain an understanding of different registry models, including establishing a registry, evaluating a registry, using registry data and the strengths and weaknesses of different registry models. We will discuss the use of registries with both identifiable and de-identified data. Ethical issues surrounding the use of these data sources for research will be discussed. We will use case studies to facilitate the learning of concepts discussed in class.

Click here for course syllabus.

Prerequisites: None
CLRES 2109: Design of CER Studies
1.0 credit(s); Offered during the Spring in odd years
The general motivation for this course is to have a culminating class on comparative effectiveness research (CER) which brings together all main concepts in CER. The course is organized as a project-based team-learning class where trainees will apply their knowledge about fundamental CER concepts to an actual problem, using existing systematic reviews and selected public data sets on real CER studies as the focus of material. Trainees will have to design an actual CER study and describe how different components of CER contribute to the topic, as well as critique work of other trainees who focus on different topic areas and methodological problems. In addition to the prerequisites listed above, students must also have completed one of the following CER track course requirements: CLRES 2108, CLRES 2120, CLRES 2121, CLRES 2300 or CLRES 2800.

Click here for course syllabus.

Prerequisites: CLRES 2010, CLRES 2020, CLRES 2107
CLRES 2120: Cost-Effectiveness Analysis in Health Care
1.0 credit(s); Offered every Fall and Spring
CLRES 2120 provides an introduction to the methods used in the economic analysis of health care programs. The course will discuss economic principles that serve as the foundation of cost-effectiveness analysis, will describe the various ratios and methodologies used in cost-effectiveness studies, will highlight the current controversies in cost-benefit analysis, and will explore issues regarding the appropriate use of cost-effectiveness in making medical decisions concerning patients and populations. Additional topics include concepts of perspective, utility analysis, discounting, and the definition of various costs and benefits.

Click here for course syllabus.

Prerequisites: None
CLRES 2121: Clinical Decision Analysis
1.0 credit(s); Offered every Fall and Spring
This course presents an overview of the theory of medical decision making. Topics include the incorporation of uncertainty and risk into medical decision making; the use of decision-making techniques in both population and individual patient settings; the design, structure, and evaluation of decision trees generated by software packages; sensitivity analysis and the stability of model outputs; and controversies concerning the perspective of the analysis and the discounting of costs and benefits. The course will help trainees become skilled in structuring and analyzing decision-making problems.

Click here for course syllabus.

Prerequisites: None
CLRES 2122: Computer Methods in Decision and Cost-Effectiveness Analysis
1.0 credit(s); Offered every Fall and Spring
CLRES 2122 expands on topics introduced in CLRES 2120 (Cost-Effectiveness Analysis in Health Care) and CLRES 2121 (Clinical Decision Analysis) and provides additional guidelines for using decision sciences in larger, more complex applications. Topics include modeling clinical processes and systems; discrete event simulation; advanced sensitivity analysis and confidence limits; controversies surrounding the use of cost-effectiveness analyses; and multiattribute utility theory.

Click here for course syllabus.

Prerequisites: CLRES 2120; CLRES 2121
CLRES 2124: Directed Study in Decision and Cost-Effectiveness Analyses
1.0-3.0 credit(s); Offered every Summer, Fall, and Spring
There are no formal class meetings. Each student will meet independently with his or her chosen faculty member and will develop a timeline and schedule of meetings and milestones for various components of the particular project or topic review. It is expected that the student and faculty member will meet every 1–2 weeks during the duration of the course.
Prerequisites: CLRES 2120; CLRES 2121; CLRES 2122
CLRES 2140: Best Practices in Clinical Research
1.0 credit(s); Offered every Spring
CLRES 2140 covers the basic operations of conducting a health services research project, from developing realistic timelines and schedules to building tracking databases, training interviewers and data collectors, monitoring data collection and budgets, reporting, and closing out a study.

Click here for course syllabus.

Prerequisites: None
CLRES 2141: Medical Writing and Presentation Skills
1.0 credit(s); Offered every Fall and Spring
Medical educators and researchers must be able to present their work clearly and effectively. However, important educational material and research data are sometimes obscured by poorly delivered presentations or poorly written papers. The main objective of this course is to help students develop excellent medical writing and presentation skills. This objective will be achieved through a combination of lectures, readings, and individual and small-group projects in which students will practice specific skills. Students will have the opportunity to be videotaped while they present a talk and will receive anonymous written feedback.

Click here for course syllabus.

Prerequisites: None
CLRES 2141: Medical Writing and Presentation Skills
1.0 credit(s); Offered every Fall and Spring
Medical educators and researchers must be able to present their work clearly and effectively. However, important educational material and research data are sometimes obscured by poorly delivered presentations or poorly written papers. The main objective of this course is to help students develop excellent medical writing and presentation skills. This objective will be achieved through a combination of lectures, readings, and individual and small-group projects in which students will practice specific skills. Students will have the opportunity to be videotaped while they present a talk and will receive anonymous written feedback.

Click here for course syllabus.

Prerequisites: None
CLRES 2170: Making the Most of Mentoring
1.0 credit(s); Offered every Fall
We strongly believe that effective mentoring is the cornerstone of a successful academic career—whether it be in education, research, or clinical work. Good mentors are able to guide mentees as they attempt to navigate through the course of their careers. This course is designed to provide a basis for understanding the mentor-mentee relationship and to provide strategies for making the most out of the experience. Topics will include communication and negotiation, the use of mentoring contracts, providing and accepting feedback, evaluating the mentoring relationship, and solving problems and meeting challenges. Fellows, postdocs, other Institute for Clinical Research Education (ICRE) trainees, and junior faculty will discover useful ways to enhance the mentoring relationship and make it a rewarding experience both for the mentees and the mentors.

Click here for course syllabus.

Prerequisites: None
CLRES 2200: Introduction to Research on Disparities in Health Care
2.0 credit(s); Offered during the Fall in even years
The objective of this course is to provide health professional trainees with knowledge and skills to understand and apply the basic principles of healthcare disparities research. Students will be introduced to a variety of healthcare disparities that have been identified in the literature. They will learn about a 3-phase conceptual framework for advancing disparities research that involves detecting (Phase 1), understanding (Phase 2), and reducing/eliminating (Phase 3) disparities. They will become familiar with methodological and conceptual issues that pertain to research designed to detect healthcare disparities, understand multi-level factors that contribute to disparities, and reduce or eliminate healthcare disparities. Students will use their knowledge and skills from the course to develop and present a research proposal focused on a healthcare disparities topic of their choice. The course will consist of didactic lectures, interactive discussions, and homework assignments to establish basic knowledge of research on disparities in health care. It will also include guest presentations by faculty with experience conducting research focused on disparities in health care. These guest presentations will provide students with concrete examples of research focusing on a broad range of healthcare disparities. The course will meet once a week for eight weeks.

Click here for course syllabus.

Prerequisites: None
CLRES 2300: Introduction to Systematic Reviews and Meta-Analyses
1.0 credit(s); Offered every Fall
The course is an overview of the concepts necessary for performing systematic reviews and meta-analyses, covered in sufficient detail to enable students to conduct their own reviews and analyses after completion of the course. Students will learn about the individual steps involved in conducting systematic reviews and meta-analyses, including developing a focused research question, assembling a team to perform the study, designing a study protocol, defining inclusion and exclusion criteria, identifying relevant literature databases (including Cochrane databases and Medline), developing literature search strategies, performing the literature search, creating a data abstraction form, handling data abstraction and management, and using statistical methods for meta-analysis. We will discuss important topics such as criteria for meta-analysis, exploration of heterogeneity, choice of a meta-analytic method, study quality assessment, sensitivity and subgroup analysis, evaluation of potential sources of bias, presentation of results, and application of review results. Each class will have both a didactic component and a hands-on component that allows students to immediately apply the concepts introduced during the session. Students will use concepts learned in this course to evaluate and update a published systematic review and meta-analysis.

Click here for course syllabus.

Prerequisites: CLRES 2005; CLRES 2020
CLRES 2320: Clinical Trials Practicum
2.0-3.0 credit(s); Offered every Summer, Fall, and Spring
The purpose of the clinical trials practicum is for trainees (fellows and junior faculty) who are (or want to be) involved with a clinical trial to obtain course credit for their research experience. Each trainee is required to work with an experienced clinical researcher (investigator) who formally agrees to provide the trainee mentorship. The investigator must be planning a clinical trial, conducting a clinical trial, or have conducted a clinical trial. Trainees are expected to become part of the research team and learn how studies or trials are actually designed, implemented, managed, and analyzed. Trainees are expected to provide an outline of readings relevant for the practicum objectives and at the end of the practicum provide summaries of their experiences and reading materials. They may also receive credit by taking a specific question and analyzing a dataset from the trial. They can write up their findings for possible publication under the supervision of the investigators and are expected to provide a written summary of their involvement that is validated by their mentors at the end of the experience. Please see the link below for the NIH's definition of clinical trials: http://grants.nih.gov/grants/peer/tree_glossary.pdf. (Prerequisites: CLRES 2800, CLRES 2810, and CLRES 2820 or instructor permission)

Click here for course syllabus.

Prerequisites: CLRES 2800; CLRES 2810; CLRES 2820
CLRES 2400: Qualitative Research Methods
1.0 credit(s); Offered every Spring
The course will introduce participants to the characteristics and various approaches to designing and conducting qualitative research projects in health and health services research. Each student will gain hands-on experience in various qualitative methods and analysis techniques while carrying out a research project related to his or her area of interest. Topics covered will include study design; data collection, with an emphasis on focus group and in-depth interviewing methods; qualitative data analysis theory, techniques, and tools; and the presentation and dissemination of qualitative research results. Course assignments will include designing an interview or focus group question protocol relevant to the student's own research interests, conducting an in-depth interview, and performing preliminary data analysis on the interview text. The final project will be tailored to meet the current research development needs of each individual student and may involve writing a focused literature review, drafting a qualitative research proposal, or writing up the results of a qualitative research project for publication.

Click here for course syllabus.

Prerequisites: None
CLRES 2430: Introduction to Community Based Participatory Research
1.0 credit(s); Offered every Spring
This course is organized around themes central to the conceptualization and implementaiton of community-based participatory research and practice (CBPRB). The goal of this course is to familiarize students with community-based participatory research and practice. Students will become conversant in seminal community-based participatory research and practice literature. Discussion, interactive learning exercises and examples of current research will be used to provide an understanding of CBPR and the associated strengths and limitations.

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CLRES 2431: Translating Research for Policy and Practice
1.0 credit(s); Offered every Spring
This course provides an introduction to concepts and skills in knowledge translation (a coordinated, collaborative approach to ensure that research findings are utilized by key stakeholders) and to the role of research in changing policy and practice at local, regional, and national levels. This module will build on concepts in Community-Partnered Research introduced in CLRES 2430. This skills-based module will introduce learners to theoretical concepts in knowledge translation (KT), dissemination and implementation science, and apply these concepts to practical exercises to translate research findings for relevance to other key stakeholders, including community partners, program developers, and policy makers. One session will be devoted specifically to skills building in legislative and media advocacy. The goal of this course is to familiarize learners with the critically important steps involved in translating research findings for relevance to stakeholders beyond academia. Discussion, interactive learning exercises, and examples of research dissemination and implementation science will be used to provide a foundation in KT as an aspect of community-partnered research.

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CLRES 2432: Concept Mapping: A Participatory Research Method
1.0 credit(s); Offered every Spring
This course provides hands-on training in the participatory research method known as concept mapping (CM). CM gives community members and other stakeholders a unique chance to have their own words communicate ideas and concepts. Research participants contribute directly in the processing of this information as it directly relates to their community and intervention needs. The goal of the course is to familiarize students with example applications of the research method and to provide training related to concept mapping data collection and analysis. Discussion interactive learning exercises, and examples of current research will be used to provide an understanding of CBPR and the associated strengths and limitations.

Click here for course syllabus.

CLRES 2601: Principles and Practices in Palliative Care Part I
1.0 credit(s); Offered every Summer
The broad objectives of this course are to provide trainees with an overview of the basic and clinical sciences underlying the professional care of dying patients and to introduce them to the primary reference sources in the field of palliative medicine. The course will be taught in small-group discussion format, with faculty drawn from content experts throughout the medical center. Discussions will combine analysis of the evidence base for a wide range of palliative care interventions with clinical case discussions. Cases will be drawn from the literature, faculty experiences, and current clinical activities of the trainees themselves.

Click here for course syllabus.

Prerequisites: None
CLRES 2602: Principles and Practices in Palliative Care Part II
1.0 credit(s); Offered every Fall
The broad objectives of this course are to provide trainees with an overview of the basic and clinical sciences underlying the professional care of dying patients and to introduce them to the primary reference sources in the field of palliative medicine. The course will be taught in small-group discussion format, with faculty drawn from content experts throughout the medical center. Discussions will combine analysis of the evidence base for a wide range of palliative care interventions with clinical case discussions. Cases will be drawn from the literature, faculty experiences, and current clinical activities of the trainees themselves.

Click here for course syllabus.

Prerequisites: CLRES 2601
CLRES 2610: Research Methods in Palliative Care
1.0 credit(s); Offered every Spring
This special methods course will provide the critical bridge between the more general research skills, which are the focus of the Degree Granting Programs in Clinical Research, and the particular challenges of doing patient-oriented research in palliative care. This 1-credit course, along with Principles and Practices of Palliative Care, is the cornerstone of the optional content specialization in palliative care. It consists of discussions of the use of specific research methods and their strengths and limitations in palliative care, a review of landmark research articles in palliative care, and a critical appraisal of the methodologies. The course is taught in a graduate seminar fashion with an emphasis on discussion and critical analysis. Sessions are often moderated by a palliative care physician and a researcher with the particular methodologies expertise under discussion.

Click here for course syllabus.

Prerequisites: None
CLRES 2700: Fundamentals of Bench Research
2.0 credit(s); Offered every Summer
The course is designed to teach fellows in training and future clinician scientists the core principles of scientific investigation. The course is organized such that fellows can learn the theory behind most of the common research approaches as well as new and innovative approaches of current scientific endeavors. In addition, participants acquire laboratory technical skills via a "learning by doing" approach in a two-week period.

Click here for course syllabus.

Prerequisites: None
CLRES 2715: Understanding and Applying OMICS
1.0 credit(s); Offered during the Spring in even years
This course will provide information on resources available at the University of Pittsburgh to facilitate high-throughput research techniques and will involve in-depth discussions of definitions and applications of genomics, proteomics, and glycomics. The course will cover issues important to tissue processing and sample collection, limitations of techniques, and special ethical issues related to storage of samples. Translational researchers will present "real-life" examples of application of these technologies, and students will be required to develop an "omics" approach to a relevant translational research question pertinent to their own field of study.

Click here for course syllabus.

Prerequisites: None
CLRES 2725: Translational Research Practicum
1.0-2.0 credit(s); Offered every Summer, Fall, and Spring
The purpose of the translational research practicum is for trainees to develop a particular skill set not offered in the usual curriculum for credit towards the translational research track Masters degree. Laboratory rotations are critical for T1 training and specialty skill development and are required in most graduate science programs. This practical format will emphasize T1 research activities and allow students to earn 1-2 credits of subspecialty elective credit by: Attending an intensive mine-course, or attending an intensive workshop, or completing a laboratory rotation in a laboratory other than their primary mentor and completing a laboratory rotation at another institution .

Click here for course syllabus.

Prerequisites: None
CLRES 2730: From Benchtop to Bedside: What Every Scientist Needs to Know
3.0 credit(s); Offered every Spring
This 10-week course is designed to teach research scientists how to navigate the path necessary to bring a basic science discovery out of the university and into the clinic. Participants will learn the criteria used by the private sector to assess whether discoveries have the potential for therapeutic or diagnostic applications. They will understand how proof-of-concept and validation experiments define the application, increase its value, and reduce its risk. The course will focus on the importance of intellectual property protection as the engine that creates a barrier to entry for competition and also enables investment from the private sector to fund the climb over regulatory and reimbursement hurdles to reach patients. This course is open to scientific researchers and others who are interested in gaining knowledge of the commercial development process. The core faculty for the course will include Office of Enterprise Development (OED) staff members and numerous guest speakers and panelists from the scientific and entrepreneurial community.

Click here for course syllabus.

Prerequisites: None
CLRES 2750: Seminar in Health Systems Leadership
1.5 credit(s); Offered every Fall and Spring
This course will consist of a series of cased-based examinations of specific managerial and leadership problems and decisions that have faced local health systems leaders in Western Pennsylvania. Health care reimbursement, licensing and accreditation, and measuring health care quality has become both more complicated and more important as pressures to reduce expenses and improve quality increase. Simultaneously, there has been a steady increase in the number of clinicians who have assumed managerial positions, such as medical directors of clinical units, directors of quality measurement and improvement programs, utilization review and many others, as well as the appearance of clinicians in the “C-suite” of many hospitals and health care organizations. Utilizing adjunct faculty who are currently (or very recently have been) executive leaders in health systems, this course will examine a series of collaborations, problems, conflicts and solutions that developed between health system administrators and clinical leadership in health care organizations in the Western PA area.

The mechanics of the course will be a series of cases, based on an actual recent issue in health care management in which the senior adjunct faculty member was involved. Students (individually or in groups) will evaluate the case, prepare a response, and make a short presentation of their “solution” to the problem to the health system executive and clinical leader involved in that case. An interactive discussion will follow.

Click here for course syllabus.

Prerequisites: None
CLRES 2800: Fundamentals of Clinical Trials
1.0 credit(s); Offered every Spring
CLRES 2800 will provide information on the first three phases (phases I, II, and III) of drug development and on fundamental components of randomized clinical trials. A majority of lectures will focus on aspects of phase III parallel group designs, with discussions on topics including the development of research questions, definition of endpoints, recruitment, randomization, blinding, data management and quality, monitoring, study closeout, and presentation and interpretation of results. The student will be introduced to good clinical practice guidelines, the principles of planning and implementing clinical research protocols, ethical issues and regulatory imperatives designed to protect human subjects in clinical research, adverse event reporting, protocol and proposal development, and publication. We will use manuscripts on clinical trials and protocols of completed studies to facilitate learning of concepts discussed in class. We highly recommend that students take analysis of variance (ANOVA) and logistic regression courses before taking this course.

Click here for course syllabus.

Prerequisites: CLRES 2005; CLRES 2010; CLRES 2020
CLRES 2810: Statistical Methods and Issues in Clinical Trials
1.0 credit(s); Offered every Spring
The course will provide in-depth information about conducting randomization, planning sample size, analyzing clinical trials (including phase I, II, and III designs), and reporting and interpreting results of studies. We will use manuscripts on clinical trials and protocols of completed studies to facilitate learning of concepts discussed in class. We highly recommend that students take analysis of variance (ANOVA) and logistic regression courses before taking this course.

Click here for course syllabus.

Prerequisites: CLRES 2005; CLRES 2020; CLRES 2800
CLRES 2813: Introduction to Patient Care and Clinical Environments
3.0 credit(s); Offered during the Fall in odd years
This 3-credit course is designed for students who have no significant clinical experience with the U.S. health care system. The course is divided into two main sections. In the first section, we will cover medical and health care concepts and terms and will discuss observational techniques derived from the Toyota Production System. In the second section of the course, students will shadow physicians in a variety of clinical settings and report back to the class on their observations, using the skills learned in the first half of the course. No previous clinical experience is assumed. Students will be expected to attend lectures and will spend a significant portion of their time observing and reporting on different clinical settings throughout the semester.

Click here for course syllabus.

Prerequisites: None
CLRES 2820: Special Topics in Clinical Trials
1.0 credit(s); Offered every Spring
The special topics course will provide information on the different types of clinical trials beyond the phase III superiority parallel group design. We will use manuscripts on special types of clinical trials to facilitate learning of concepts discussed in class. We highly recommend that students take analysis of variance (ANOVA) and logistic regression courses before taking this course.

Click here for course syllabus.

Prerequisites: CLRES 2005; CLRES 2020; CLRES 2800; CLRES 2810
CLRES 3010: PhD Independent and Directed Research
1.0-3.0 credit(s); Offered every Summer, Fall, and Spring
CLRES 3010 is an independent or directed research course for the PhD in Clinical and Translational Science.
Prerequisites: None
CLRES 3020: Directed Study
1.0-9.0 credit(s); Offered every Summer, Fall, and Spring
This course provides the student with an opportunity ti carry out a specific project in any area of interest in clinical and translational science.
Prerequisites: None
CLRES 3040: PhD Dissertation Research
1.0-14.0 credit(s); Offered every Summer, Fall, and Spring
Dissertation research credits towards PhD in Clinical and Translational Science.
Prerequisites: None
MSCMP 3790: Basics of Personalized Medicine
3.0 credit(s); Offered every Fall
Personalized medicine is becoming a reality that is being driven by ongoing discoveries in cell biology, genomics, proteomics, and metabolomics. The translational speed of these discoveries, particularly in the diagnostic, prognostic, and theragnostic arenas, is rapid. We believe that in the future personalized medicine diagnostics will involve both physicians and basic scientists. A major obstacle to this approach is the lack of training components for basic scientists in this area. This course aims to close that gap and provide an appreciation for, and understanding of, key principles of clinical development and testing in order to help bridge this gap. The course will be designed to delve into concepts of personalized medicine using focused topic areas. The first week will introduce the principles and overriding concepts of clinical test development, which differ qualitatively from investigational research. Next there will be six 2-week sessions, with each section focusing on a separate testing modality. Topics will include inherited genetic diseases and predisposition's, acquired genetic changes (cancer), metabolomic profiles of endocrine diseases, immune networks for transplant and rejection, proteomic profiling in blood disorders, and proteomic detection of shock and organ failure.

Click here for course syllabus.

Prerequisites: None
NROSCI 2014: Speaking of Science
3.0 credit(s); Offered every Fall and Spring
Students will learn strategies for giving presentations about science to both a scientific audience and a public audience. Topics covered will include (1) how to engage your audience, (2) the art of breaking down your message, (3) tips for how to make clear, interesting slides, and (4) pointers on presentation style. All audiences want to learn interesting new scientific information-and have it delivered as a good story in an understandable manner by a personable, easy to approach person. You want to emphasize your message, stay focused, and convey the importance of your message while being interesting, maintaining the attention of the audience and making the learning process enjoyable. Guest speakers will provide background information about various uses of scientific information in the public domain. Communication skills, including knowing your audience and why they are interested in the information you are speaking about, how to translate scientific jargon into understandable concepts for the public, and how to keep the audience engaged will be discussed. Pointers will be given on answering questions, being conversational, and conveying the 'big picture'. Students will give a number of presentations in this course and learn to receive and give feedback effectively.
Prerequisites: None
NROSCI 2410: Translating Science
3.0 credit(s); Offered every Fall and Spring
Students will work in creative teams of 2-3 students/team to develop creative new outreach tools for communication of science to the public (new lectures, laboratories, videos, films, activities). At the beginning of the semester, didactic lectures will cover background information about how to effectively communicate scientific information, how to break down a message, production of effective, engaging slides, animations and videos, and the use of hands-on activities to engage the audience. Course instructors with expertise in film, videos, educational games, and use of museum exhibits will be included. Students will then choose a topic area they wish to create an outreach lecture/video/etc. in, and with the assistance of Dr. Cameron you will choose a scientific adviser with specific expertise on the topic you will develop and outreach tool for. Students will do background reading for the development of their outreach tool and have discussions with their adviser. If developing a lecture, students will develop a set of PowerPoint slides for the lecture, the lecture text with background references, and hands-on activities to compliment the lecture for both a junior high and a high school version of the lecture. They will present the lectures at one of the grade levels it was designed for. For other activities, the activity will be developed along with background information regarding the use of the activity. The activity will be presented to a public group.
Prerequisites: None
PHARM 3140: Introduction to Translational Research in Health Sciences
2.0 credit(s); Offered during the Fall in odd years
This course will provide students with a comprehensive survey of the processes involved in translating research discoveries into practices that promote health and prevent disease. The specific topics to be covered are listed in the lecture schedule and include the implementation of new therapies as standards of care and the application of innovative preventive services. Various research methodologies, including those encompassed in the drug development process, will be discussed. The course will offer lectures via electronic media and will use a collaborative learning approach to classroom activities.

Click here for course syllabus.

Prerequisites: None

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MEDICAL EDUCATION

MEDEDU 2005: Computer Methods in Clinical Research
1.0 credit(s); Offered every Summer
The course provides instruction on the use of computerized methods for clinical research. Dataset manipulation, descriptive statistics, and the graphical presentation of data will be presented using a standard statistical package.

Click here for course syllabus.

Prerequisites: None
MEDEDU 2010: Clinical Research Methods
3.0 credit(s); Offered every Summer
This course covers fundamental concepts and basic analytic methods pertaining to the design, analysis, and interpretation of clinical research studies. The course is broadly divided into three major analytic areas: (1) basic epidemiology and observational methods, (2) interventional and randomized controlled trials, and (3) clinical epidemiology and evidence-based medicine. Each section of the course will last 7–9 sessions and culminate in a short examination. The first section of the course will cover concepts of association and outcome, introduce standard epidemiologic concepts of incidence and prevalence, and define and describe relative risk, absolute risk, attributable risk, and the various methods for calculating these quantities in different observational research designs. Definitions of and methods for reducing bias and confounding are major components of this section. The second section introduces interventional trials, including the four phases of drug trials, the importance and effects of randomization, and the analysis and interpretation of controlled trials. Methods for comparing results across trials, as well as an introduction to nonstandard trial designs, are provided. The final section of the course introduces the concepts of clinical epidemiology, including evidence-based medicine, the interpretation of diagnostic tests, the construction and use of clinical prediction rules, and the evaluation of screening for chronic disease.

Click here for course syllabus.

Prerequisites: None
MEDEDU 2020: Biostatistics
4.0 credit(s); Offered every Summer
This course focuses on basic concepts and statistical methods and their application to problems in the health and biomedical sciences. Topics include data description and summarization, basic probability theory, estimation, and hypothesis testing with emphasis on one- and two-sample comparisons involving continuous and categorical data. Linear regression and analysis of variance will be introduced. Trainees will develop their analytic skills through the analysis and discussion of large clinical studies.

Click here for course syllabus.

Prerequisites: MEDEDU 2005
MEDEDU 2040: Measurement in Clinical Research
1.0 credit(s); Offered every Summer
The course focuses on properties of good measurement that are integral to the research process. Specific objectives are to analyze methods for testing psychometric properties (reliability and validity) of psychological instruments and physiological instruments; to evaluate the adequacy of selected scaling methodologies used in research; to apply knowledge of instrumentation to the description of a psychosocial instrument and a physiological instrument for a research proposal; and to synthesize course content with statistical criteria for scale evaluation and make decisions regarding scale revision. The domain sampling model is presented as the major theory of measurement error, with the parallel test model presented as a special case of the domain sampling model. The construct, criterion, and content validity of psychosocial instruments are explored, and methods for evaluating each of these relative to specific instruments are presented. A variety of scaling methodologies, as well as the principles involved in the design and formatting of questionnaires, will be discussed.

Click here for course syllabus.

Prerequisites: None
MEDEDU 2080: Master's Thesis Research
1.0-3.0 credit(s); Offered every Summer, Fall, and Spring
Trainees may register for this course with approval from the mentor and selected faculty of the Degree Granting Programs in Medical Education Curriculum Committee. The course is designed for trainees who are prepared to undertake their substantive research project or thesis.
Prerequisites: None
MEDEDU 2100: Enhancing Teaching Skills For the Clinician Educator
2.0 credit(s); Offered every Fall
This course will briefly review the basic principles of adult learning as they relate to clinician-educators but will devote the majority of the time to discussing, developing, and advancing teaching skills of clinician-educators. Using a combination of formal didactics, presentations by students, role playing, and videotape review, participants will have ample opportunity to refine their skills in case-based learning, teaching at the bedside, and teaching in small and large groups. Topics will also include setting goals and expectations, feedback and evaluation, and dealing with the student in need of remediation. MEDEDU 2100 is intended to complement the Medical Mind, Cognitive Studies in Medicine, and Enhanced Teaching Skills: Longitudinal Practicum, and, in an integrated fashion, provide comprehensive knowledge and experience to shape future teaching skills of the master teacher.

Click here for course syllabus.

Prerequisites: None
MEDEDU 2111: Fundamentals of Adult Learning in Medical Education
1.0 credit(s); Offered during the Fall in odd years
At the completion of this course, participants will have demonstrated through class participation and written assignments, 1) knowledge of current research and theory on the adult learner and adult learning as they relate to the practice of adult education, 2) understanding of the theoretical basis of clinical reasoning and concepts of expertise and 3) skill in the selection and use of theoretical foundation of learning as it applies to the context of medical education practice.

Click here for course syllabus.

Prerequisites: None
MEDEDU 2120: Professional Development
1.0 credit(s); Offered every Summer
Academic physicians who function as clinician-educators face career challenges unique to their career path. This course will provide future clinician-educators with information about these challenges so they are better prepared when starting their career. In addition, the course will provide specific skills to enhance the ability of clinician-educators to set goals, demonstrate their suitability for promotion, manage time effectively, and function in leadership roles. This course is open to Medical Education students ONLY.

Click here for course syllabus.

Prerequisites: None
MEDEDU 2130: Curriculum Development
1.0 credit(s); Offered every Summer
This course is designed to explore and develop the principles of curriculum design, implementation, and evaluation. Students will learn the fundamentals of developing goals and objectives; performing a needs assessment for curriculum development; designing the most efficient teaching strategy, including lecture, workshop, and problem-based learning sessions; evaluating student performance, including both knowledge assessment and performance-based assessment; evaluating faculty performance and course success; and strategies for grading.

Click here for course syllabus.

Prerequisites: None
MEDEDU 2131: Strategies for Dealing with the Problem Learner
1.0 credit(s); Offered every Fall
MEDEDU 2131 is designed to be a practical, hands-on approach to dealing with students who present with learning difficulties. Both didactic instruction and small-group problem solving for difficult learners will be presented. The goals for the course are to learn how to identify problem learners; to develop a differential diagnosis of problem learner behavior; to develop strategies for remediation and monitoring remediation; to review strategies for documentation and tracking of problem students; and to review issues of competency and promotion.

Click here for course syllabus.

Prerequisites: None
MEDEDU 2140: Medical Writing and Presentation Skills
1.0 credit(s); Offered every Fall and Spring
Medical educators and researchers must be able to present their work clearly and effectively. However, important educational material and research data are sometimes obscured by poorly delivered presentations or poorly written papers. The main objective of this course is to help students develop excellent medical writing and presentation skills. This objective will be achieved through a combination of lectures, readings, and individual and small-group projects in which students will practice specific skills. Students will have the opportunity to be videotaped while they present a talk and will receive anonymous written feedback.

Click here for course syllabus.

Prerequisites: None
MEDEDU 2150: Medical Education: Current Practice, Administration and Future Directions
1.0 credit(s); Offered every Spring
This course provides an overview of the practice of medical education in the United States, including issues affecting medical student curricula, residency training, and continuing medical education. We will examine forces shaping medical education by reviewing its history, financing, accreditation processes, social responsibility, and public accountability. Clinician-educator pathways will be presented, and promotion and tenure processes from this perspective will be summarized. The practical aspects of designing, implementing, and sustaining an educational program will be explored.

Click here for course syllabus.

Prerequisites: None
MEDEDU 2160: Topics in Medical Education and Medical Education Research
1.0 credit(s); Offered every Summer, Fall, and Spring
This seminar series includes critical discussions and evaluations of relevant topics in medical education and methods employed by researchers in medical education. The seminars on the first Wednesday of the month consist of topics that critically evaluate new teaching methods or educational curricula. The seminars on the third Wednesday of the month deal with topics in research methods in medical education and serve as a forum to present research in progress or completed research projects. Enrollees for this series are expected to present at one of these conferences during the year, having reviewed their presentation topic with the course director prior to the session. Attendance at 16 sessions is required for 1 credit.

Click here for course syllabus.

Prerequisites: None
MEDEDU 2170: Making the Most of Mentoring
1.0 credit(s); Offered every Fall
We strongly believe that effective mentoring is the cornerstone of a successful academic career—whether it be in education, research, or clinical work. Good mentors are able to guide mentees as they attempt to navigate through the course of their careers. This course is designed to provide a basis for understanding the mentor-mentee relationship and to provide strategies for making the most out of the experience. Topics will include communication and negotiation, the use of mentoring contracts, providing and accepting feedback, evaluating the mentoring relationship, and solving problems and meeting challenges. Fellows, postdocs, other Institute for Clinical Research Education (ICRE) trainees, and junior faculty will discover useful ways to enhance the mentoring relationship and make it a rewarding experience both for the mentees and the mentors.

Click here for course syllabus.

Prerequisites: None
MEDEDU 2190: Teaching Across Teams
1.0 credit(s); Offered during the Spring in odd years
This special educational course will provide a component that is rarely offered in medical education and is often not provided in other health professions education. In the course, trainees will (1) learn about the training that other health professionals receive and come to understand the purpose of multidisciplinary teams as well as each providers role on the team, (2) review and practice critical communication skills necessary to build teams and negotiate conflict,(3) learn educational methodology to assess team communication skills, and (4) have the opportunity to participate in interdisciplinary learner teaching.

Click here for course syllabus.

Prerequisites: None
MEDEDU 2201: Teaching Practicum: Outpatient Teaching
1.0-3.0 credit(s); Offered every Summer, Fall, and Spring
Teaching in the outpatient setting is an important activity for clinician-educators in academic and community practice. This course involves 16–48 hours of observed outpatient clinical teaching. The student will identify a primary site and preceptor who will be responsible for observations and evaluations of teaching, will perform monthly evaluations, and will submit a formal summative evaluation at the conclusion of the observations. The student will submit a formal personal reflections response to the teaching experience, including plans for improvement in teaching skills.
Prerequisites: None
MEDEDU 2202: Teaching Practicum: Inpatient Teaching
1.0 credit(s); Offered every Summer, Fall, and Spring
Teaching in an inpatient setting is an important activity for clinician-educators in academic and community practice. This course involves 16 hours of observed clinical teaching on an inpatient service (including consult medicine). The student will identify a primary preceptor who will be responsible for observations and evaluations of clinical teaching in the sessions, an evaluation after each session, and a formal summative evaluation. The student will submit a formal personal reflections response to the teaching experience.
Prerequisites: None
MEDEDU 2203: Teaching Practicum: Classroom Teaching
0.5 credit(s); Offered every Summer, Fall, and Spring
Classroom teaching is an important activity for clinician-educators. This 0.5-credit course, in which students can enroll twice for a maximum of 1 credit, consists of 8 hours of observed and evaluated nonclinical classroom teaching, lecturing, or problem-based learning sessions. The student must identify and list teaching sessions and identify a primary preceptor who will be responsible for observation and evaluation of the teaching. Students will be evaluated after each session, and a formal summative evaluation by the primary preceptor will serve as the main determinant of the final grade. The student must also write a personal reflection essay on the teaching, including personal plans for continued improvement.
Prerequisites: None
MEDEDU 2220: Teaching Evidence-Based Medicine
1.0 credit(s); Offered every Summer
This course will introduce the core concepts of evidence-based medicine (EBM) and will introduce methods to teach EBM in the clinical setting. The course will begin by reviewing the history of EBM and clinical epidemiology and describing how EBM became a new "paradigm of clinical practice." It will review the practices of EBM as they relate to clinical questions of therapy, diagnosis, prognosis, and harm. It will then describe the current approaches to teaching EBM and discuss the literature to support those approaches.

Click here for course syllabus.

Prerequisites: None
MEDEDU 2230: Innovative Teaching Strategies
2.0 credit(s); Offered during the Spring in even years
This course is designed to enable medical educators to use information and telecommunications technology (ITT) to expand access to educational resources, implement new models of education, and enhance student and physician competence throughout the continuum of training and practice.

Click here for course syllabus.

Prerequisites: None
MEDEDU 2240: Cultural Competence
1.0 credit(s); Offered during the Spring in even years
Cultural differences have always been integral to U.S. society and represent a dynamic mixture of races, ethnicities, and beliefs. Indeed, these differences are one of the characteristics most associated with Americans overseas. Only recently has there been recognition of the importance of these cultural differences in medical education. Therefore, there is still some confusion in medical academia regarding what the focus should be and why cultural competence is now of interest to the Liaison Committee on Medical Education, the accrediting body for allopathic medical schools, universities, managed care organizations, and various governmental bodies. This course is designed to explore the impact of diversity on the training of physicians and other health care providers.

Click here for course syllabus.

Prerequisites: None
MEDEDU 2250: Teaching Communication Skills
2.0 credit(s); Offered every Fall
The most common thing that a physician does in his or her career is communicate with patients. This is the method that physicians use to gather information for the medical history, educate patients about their illness, and obtain informed consent regarding the various therapeutic options. During the past 25 years, doctor-patient communication has received increasing attention in medical education. Every medical school currently has a course focusing on communication skills, and many internal medicine, family medicine, and pediatric programs devote attention to these skills. The new ACGME requirements list communication skills as one of the six major focuses. In the future, physicians will need to be able to document their communications skills for certification and licensure. Over the past 10 years, there have been increasing data regarding the efficacy of educational interventions to improve physician communication skills. Courses at the medical school level and at the residency level need to incorporate these data to develop evidence-based interventions. The point of this course is to ensure that medical educators both understand the data and have the practical skills needed to design and teach communication courses.

Click here for course syllabus.

Prerequisites: None
MEDEDU 2260: Seminar Series in Medical Education
1.0 credit(s)
This course allows students the flexibility to choose among three established seminar series in medical education and to attend specific topics of interest and relevance to their teaching roles. The seminar series are the Medical Educational Research Methods and Innovative Designs (MERMAID) Series, the Academy of Master Educators (AME) Seminar Series, and Medical Education Grand Rounds. Specific information about dates and current and past topics for each series can be found on the series Web sites. To receive credit, students must document their attendance at 16 sessions. To promote active learning and enhance the relevance of the topics to teaching, the enrollees for this course will be required to choose one skill or learning point from any of the 16 sessions attended and write a one-page (maximum) paper describing how this skill or learning point was implemented in one of their teaching assignments or activities and also describing the outcome. This paper needs to be completed prior to credit allocation and submitted to the course director.

Click here for course syllabus.

Prerequisites: None
MEDEDU 2325: Learning About Learning
1.0 credit(s); Offered every Spring
The process by which physicians make decisions is complicated and multifactorial. Understanding this process is critical for teaching the principles of clinical problem solving and medical decision making. Many theories and strategies have been put forward to better elucidate the process. The overall goals of this course are to introduce the learner to the principles of adult learning, to demonstrate how the principles are applied in the medical arena, and to develop strategies for teaching problem-solving and medical decision-making skills in the clinical setting.

Click here for course syllabus.

Prerequisites: None

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COURSES OFFERED ONLINE/HYBRID COURSES

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COURSES OFFERED THROUGH OTHER UNIVERSITY DEPARTMENTS

How to search for classes online using the Student Center


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